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So you haven’t yet got your Cuba itinerary and you’re not really sure what’s waiting for you on the Caribbean island. So allow me to set the scene…
Retro cars racing through a melting, orange, Havana sunset.
Sultry teenagers tapping their toes to an infectious salsa-beat.
The distant clip-clop of a horse-drawn carriage on cobbled streets.
Thick, sweet cigar smoke billowing from the mouths of elderly locals…

Welcome to Cuba.

Life in Cuba is a complicated, beautiful…mess. Don’t expect things to work logically, because a lot of the time they won’t. But do expect a vibrant way of living unparalleled to any other place, with some of the friendliest people in the world.

After spending almost a month in Cuba from December 2016-January 2017, experiencing all the highs and lows it has to offer, and talking to plenty of Cubans, I’ve compiled a list of essential need-to-knows.

Because although Cuba hasn’t really been shrouded in mystery (at least not for travellers outside the US), there’s a lot of misinformation out there about what life in Cuba is really like for both locals and tourists.

Here are 12 crazy things you should know about Cuba before you go.

      1. Hitch-hiking is a way of life

        Life in Cuba
        Casually waiting by my taxi…

        I read in someone’s Cuba Lonely Planet that the country has less traffic on the road than 1940s’ Britain. And driving around is definitely a bit eerie – a  bit 28 Days Later if you will.  Like it’s normal to pass groups of people at the side of the motorway, surrounded by bags, thumbing lifts and running desperately towards the nearest moving vehicle because car ownership is so rare in Cuba that all cars and trucks are potential taxis. I’ve also read online that it’s mandatory for government vehicles to pick up locals and that it’s illegal for Cubans to take foreigners in their cars without a taxi license. (I can attest to the latter part because once, my entire taxi was taken to the police station – with all of us in it – when a street cop realised I was a tourist and not a Cuban).

      2. There are queues for everything 

        Life in Cuba
        A one-hour queue for Churros (I was in it, obvviously)

        Being British I thought I could handle a line or two, but Cuba takes it to a whole other level; there are queues for buying water, street food, getting into museums, waiting for taxis and of course, the coveted Wi-fi cards.

      3. Cuban queues are different to ALL other queues in the world so don’t try and queue like you do back home

        Life in Cuba
        Chilling with some Cubans and definitely not queuing

        Cubans have their own distinctive style of queuing that basically works like this; imagine you’re the last person to join ANY queue in Cuba. You have to say: “ultima persona?” meaning “who’s the last person?” to find out where the line ends. The person who was last will make themselves known until someone else comes along and asks if you’re the “ultima”, to which you will say yes, and so it continues so everyone knows who is in front and behind them. Why? Well it’s really normal for Cubans to dip out of line and return back again one, two, or three hours later – so remembering who is around you is supposed to stop things getting confusing (it doesn’t).

      4. Wi-Fi is rationed with cards

        Life in Cuba
        A Cuban Wi-Fi card

        Ok, so although not rationed in the WW2-sense, accessing the internet is a mission. You’ll need to purchase a one or five -hour Wi-Fi card ($1.50 and $5.50 respectively) from either the national internet provider, ETEC (expect queues of at least 90 minutes), or from street hustlers and other shops who will charge you more than double (up to $7 for one hour, sometimes). Another normal part of life in Cuba!

      5. Wi-Fi is only accessible from certain parks and hotels

        Life in Cuba
        Logging in, whilst in the street

        This would never work in the UK because it rains all the time, but life in Cuba is characterised by public Wi-Fi spots, outside. Once you have your card, you need to head to a designated spot (recognisable because everyone’s sitting in the street with their phones/laptops) and login. Touristy hotels also have Wi-Fi but sometimes Cubans aren’t allowed in.

      6. There are two currencies

        Life in Cuba
        Above: CUP. Below: CUC

        CUC (peso convertible) is used for most tourist activities, hotel prices, club entry and taxi fares and is pinned to the dollar. CUP (peso Cubano or moneda nacional) is known as the ‘local’ currency and is accepted almost everywhere, but is mainly used for street food, buses and other ‘local’ activities.
        1 CUC = $~1 USD = 25 CUP

      7. Both currencies are called ‘pesos’ amoung locals

        Life in Cuba
        Paying for coffee in the street in Havana would be in moneda Nacional, not CUC

        Just to confuse things even more.

      8. The average monthly Cuban wage is $25

        Life in Cuba
        A pro-Fidel poster

        Doctors, receptionists, politicians… life in Cuba means everyone makes $25 a month thanks to a Communist regime that’s been enforced since 1959 which, as a consequence, means the hustle in Cuba is also very real (scams are everywhere). However, looking at the average Cuban you’d never guess the extent of their poverty; they’re fiercely proud and it’s common to see guys dressed in head to toe labels.

      9. Cubans don’t have mortgages

        No mortgages in Havana, or elsewhere

        They also have some of the best doctors in the world.  A couple of very big advantages to a Communist dictatorship.

      10. There are two prices for NEARLY everything

        Life in Cuba
        Market shopping

        The local price and the tourist price. And that applies, no matter what currency you’re paying in. Museums, clubs and buses will advertise both prices openly but sometimes in local shops and markets, it’s just kind of  just unsaid which can be frustrating. For example, people often assumed I was Cubana when I hid my camera (and spoke very little) and one time when my accent must have been particularly good, I paid 0.50c/CUC for a portion of churros in the street. The following week I returned and was fed some BS about the price changing to $1 because of the packet size, when I’d just watched Cubans pay the price I’d been charged the week before. My Cuban friend told me it’s because I looked like a tourist that day.

      11. Three generations of families often live in one space

        Life in Cuba
        Making friends in a Cuban house

        Staying in a couple of Havana home-stays, I witnessed how life in Cuba really is for the average family. Often times in one tiny space, you’ll have; a mother and/or father, a grand-parent, a baby, plus various cousins and brothers and sisters. The largest, nicest rooms are rented out to the tourists (and came with air-con, fridges, a double beds) whereas the Cubans often piled into one or two rooms, with shared beds.

      12. Christmas isn’t really a thing

        Life in Cuba
        Business as normal in Havana on Christmas day

        I travelled through Cuba during Christmas and it’s like any other day. A few restaurants may have some decorations up and you might spot a waiter in a Santa hat, but that’s about it. This was probably because Christmas was actually banned in Cuba until 1997.

Experiencing life in Cuba as a tourist, is an unforgettable, eye-opening, slightly maddening experience. Could I live there? Probably, yeah – but not for too long because the restrictiveness of daily life might break me. (One time I cried after queuing for 2 hours only to learn that they were out of Wi-Fi cards). I’m still itching to get back though…

Are you going to Cuba or have you experienced any of the above? Tell me!

You’re not black here. The locals won’t call you black“.

These were some of the first words uttered to me by a (white, European, male) island inhabitant when I arrived on Big Corn Island.

You’s a white gyal,” another friend who was born and raised on the island his whole life, told me on the bleach-white sands, one blisteringly hot day.

I remember looking at all the other people, similar in shade to me and I felt… un poco confuso (a little confused).

Why could I not be black here?!

Part of the beauty of Big Corn island is that its reputation is almost totally eclipsed by its more famous neighbour, Little Corn island.

This allows the larger, more overlooked of the two locations to retain a feeling of true remoteness — this, despite the fact more than 10,000 people live there.

But because most of them are locals and because most tourists head straight to Little Corn, for the visitors who really give the bigger island a chance, they’ll feel as if they’ve discovered their own little slice of paradise.

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For years, Morocco has held this weird allure for me. And Fez, Morocco even more so.

There’s something about the North African country with its middle-eastern vibe, French influences, mix of Muslim traditions and Spanish music that’s really captivating.  And I’m obsessed with places that are beautifully blended with contrasting cultures — like Fez.

That, and the Ryanair flights to Fez were £55 return. (I kid you not, they had the sale to end all sales in May 2015 and if you’re UK based, you should check the site regularly for cheap deals).

But if you’re looking for a cheap city break with a difference, Fez is full of surprises. Situated 240 miles north of its big-sister-city, Marrakech, Fez is a medieval and magical place where you can live like a Queen and still come back with change.

Here’s everything you should know before you make Fez, Morocco your next city break…

When people ask me why I travel, maybe I’ll  direct them to this post (which I’ve put off publishing for days) rather than offering up some vague explanation about “finding myself”.

“Finding myself”  in relation to my travels make it sound as if I actually left my right leg in Medellin, or something. But “finding myself” is exactly what I’m trying to do.

Because after 23 years of thinking that I knew my ethnic background —  of thinking that I knew who I was — I have found out news that changes everything, but at the same time, nothing:

I am (probably) black.

That statement in itself might look ridiculous to anyone who doesn’t know me. To anyone who has stumbled across this post, seen a couple of my photos and thought;

Is this girl crazy? She’s very clearly not white. ~Insert Specsavers joke here.~

But for the longest time I grew up believing that I was. White, that is.

When considering where to book a Spanish home stay in Central America a couple of weeks back, I found myself really spoilt for choice, which is only a good thing when it comes to travel plans, I reckon.

I’d heard from friends and other backpackers, that Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua were all great places to learn the language and stay with locals, but I couldn’t decide where to fly to.

To me, throwing myself into a stranger’s house to learn a language wasn’t a scary prospect, so that part would be the same, where-ever I chose to go. If it was going to be awkward, or isolating I was prepared for that to happen in any country.

But I love travelling local and I love travelling authentic so with the money and the fear factored out, I had to look at other elements to help me decide where I wanted to learn.

Viet Nam long held this wonderful allure for me; I backpacked around the country for three weeks in 2013 and more recently, I was invited on a trip in September 2016 with Topdeck Travel and was ecstatic to return. Travelling Viet Nam whilst black seems to be a bit of a concern for many travellers (there are quite a few negative experiences floating about online) but in the main part, I’ve loved my time there. There are a few little cultural nuances to be aware of if you’re planning a trip there as a black or brown person, however.

I’ve now been in Nicaragua for a week. I decided to leave the frenetic city of New York  in favour of the slower pace of life on-the-go. That sounds ironic but New York really doesn’t sleep. Plus, I was lonely, it was getting fucking cold, I wasn’t making enough money to stay and realised: WAIT WHY PUT MYSELF THROUGH THIS?  I can do freelance work online in place with a much lower cost of living.

For now at least, an office 9-5 just isn’t what I want to do. Nope. I want to explore, grow and work as I move about, building my own brand not someone elses’.  So knowing that I (kind of) had enough contacts and freelance work from working in London and NYC, I thought I’d take that chance.

When it comes to searching online, loneliness whilst travelling isn’t too much of a hot topic. I suppose it’s because most travel bloggers and travel writers are paid to sell, sell, SELL that dream!  And loneliness, (much like death) just doesn’t sell much at all unless you’re a (dead) creative genius.

Because who really wants to hear about the sad part of your vay-cay? It’s also kind of hard to feel sorry for someone who is sipping cocktails on the beach if you’re at home viewing their (seemingly perfect) holiday pictures from your work computer. Sympathy will be in short supply there, you can be sure.

I don’t want to moan. This isn’t a moany post. But it’s an honest one. Travelling solo can be the most isolating thing in the world. And if you’re not prepared to roll with the punches when it hits, loneliness can knock you out and send you home. For real.

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